New Strategies for Rain Harvesting

Pam Lott, MLA (Ashland, OR), American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association, “Using rainwater to alleviate water shortages.”

Pam Lott has a master’s degree in landscape architecture from the University of Oregon and is accredited in rain water harvesting systems by the American Rainwater Catchment Association. Their objective is, through building and landscape design, to capture, collect and store rainwater and put it to positive use.

Ms. Lott notes that in Southern Oregon, winters are very wet and summers are very dry. Hence, the need to trap and retain seasonally renewable water.

There are active and passive catchment systems. They include the building of cisterns (passive) and landscaping in a way that retains moisture (active).

Soil with a high organic content retains up to three times as much moisture as purely mineral soil.

Collecting and using near where the rain falls saves transportation costs.

She encourages dryland farming and gardening methods – don’t plant on raised berms but in the ditches between berms, where moisture collects. “Slow it, spread it, sink it.”

Plastic and fabric barriers can be helpful in reducing weeds and retaining water but mulching is much better. The best way to water is by hand with a hose because you can adjust the amount of water each plant receives.

Drip irrigation is the most efficient. However, it can be expensive. Mist watering is also efficient.

Planting appropriate plants for the amount of natural rainfalls is also helpful in utilizing water.

Website: http://www.valleyrainharvesting.com. Also the ARCSA website.

August 20, 2010

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Sun Protective Clothing

UV Sun Protective Clothing Can Save Your Life

Sharon Kleyne interview with Adam Perl (Higganum, CT), President of “Alex and Me,” UV sun protective clothing company. Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water*, June 23, 2008.

Summer has arrived, and with it an increased emphasis on sun and sunburn protection. The first line of defense against the damaging effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from summer sun is the clothing you wear. Education, and intelligent choices about sun protective clothing, no matter what the season, could save your life.

In an age of global climate change and increasingly dry air, the dangers of skin and eye exposure to solar radiation (sunshine) are increasing and the need to protect yourself – every time you go in the sun – is also increasing. Solar radiation, especially Ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation, can cause dry skin and dry eyes, damage the skin’s collagen to cause premature skin aging, and damage skin DNA to cause skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma.

Sharon Kleyne, Host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water syndicated radio talk show, urges everyone to apply sunscreen every time you go in the sun, summer or winter (the lotion in sunscreen also helps skin retain water, further increasing resistance to UV radiation), and to purchase and wear sun protective clothing.

Sharon’s interview (paraphrased and abbreviated):

Sharon Kleyne: Today’s guest is Adam Perl, President of “Alex and Me,” a company specializing in the sale of sun protective clothing brands designed to protect skin from ultraviolet (UV) rays. Good morning, Adam. Tell us about “Alex and Me.”

Adam Perl: “Alex and Me” has been in business for eleven years. Alex is the child of the original owner and the original product line was for children.

S: How did you become interested in sun protective clothing?

A: We market clothing in Australia, where UV protection is critical because of ozone layer thinning. Children there are not allowed outdoors at recess without at least wearing a hat made of Ultraviolet Protective Fabric (UPF). Our first UPF product was a brand of children’s clothing for Australia. We now carry three dozen UPF brands, for adults and children. We sell a lot of outdoor recreation clothing, especially for the beach.

S: Teach us about UPF ratings for fabric.

A: There are two approaches to UV protection. Fabric can be chemically treated or the manufacturer can tighten the weave (thread count) and increase the thickness and density so less sunlight penetrates. With treated cotton, the embedded chemical lasts 20 to 30 washings. Synthetic fabrics are not usually treated.

S: Treated with what? Are the chemicals allergenic or dehydrating?

A: That’s a good question. As it happens, the protection in 90% of our products is based on weave. Originally, UPF clothing was very heavy and dark. Now it’s much lighter and brighter. Dark colors absorb more light and can get hot. Lighter colors reflect light and are cooler.

S: How do UPF fabrics differ from normal fabrics?

A: They aren’t noticeably different. And a tighter weave does not add value to the product. What does add value is the UPF label. Companies such as Columbia Outfitters and Patagonia are now starting to make UPF sportswear.

S: How much sun protection can fabrics offer?

A: A dry white t-shirt offers the same protection as sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 10, which is moderate. A pair of blue denim jeans has an SPF of 1,700. Obviously, though, the jeans are hotter.

S: What is your most commonly purchased item?

A: Swim shirts, also called “rash guards.” They’re very light and look like surfer shirts. We also sell an enormous number of beach hats, with loose flaps over the neck and ears. We also have clothing for traveling, fishing, hiking, biking, gardening and other outdoor sports.

S: And your website?

A: http://www.alexandme.com.

S: Any final words?

A: Be proactive in the sun. Skin cancer from sun exposure may not show up for decades.

S: Thank you, Adam.

*Don’t miss the Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water Mondays at 10 a.m. PST/PDT. The syndicated show may be heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Radio and Apple iTunes. Go to www.SharonKleyneHour.com for summaries and replays of past shows.

© 2011 Bio Logic Aqua Research All Rights Reserved.

Water, Global Warming and International Boundaries

(Note: World Water Week, sponsored by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), is an annual global conference that takes place in Stockholm each August. It’s focus on the global water crisis, healthy water and sanitation, water and natural health, water diseases, worldwide drought, climate change and natural health is compatible with the mission of the Sharon Kleyne Hour. Flavia Loures is a specialist in International water law and policy for the World Wildlife Fund, which is vitally interested on the impact of the global water crisis on human and animal health and demographics.)

Ms. Loures lives in Washington DC and was interviewed from Stockholm, Sweden, where she was participating in World Water Week – 2010. Her topic was “Transboundary Water,” or water that crosses international borders (she was born in Brazil). Flavia has been attending World Water Week since 2006 and believes that it is creating global awareness and momentum.

There is an extensive body of international law regarding shared water between nations and the world could come together, if the countries involved were willing, to settle most regional water wars. In Stockholm, they tend to take an “internationalist” point of view whereas on the ground, people tend to be more fiercely nationalistic. Continue reading “Water, Global Warming and International Boundaries”