Sharon Kleyne Hour Guest Touts Organic Dry Land Farming as Draught Solution

Lower annual rainfall amounts and the depletion of ancient underground aquifers as a result of excessive crop irrigation are facts of life for farmers in many drought states of the American Western and Midwest (and more recently, the South). One promising solution is “organic dry land farming.” That was the conclusion of Fred Kirschenmann, PhD, in an interview on the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water, talk radio show of October 8, 2012.

A Professor of Agriculture at Iowa State University, Dr. Kirschenmann also operates a large family farm in North Dakota, dedicated to entirely to dry land wheat farming. According to Kirschenmann, 70% of water in the United States is used for agriculture. Even where water is plentiful, good soil moisture retention, and good microbial soil health, will greatly benefit crop production and quality.

The key to water retention is the soil’s organic content (i.e., microbes and plant and animal waste). Soil with 1% organic material holds 33 pounds of fresh water per cubic yard while soil with 5% organic material holds 195 pounds. On average, agricultural soil in the US contains 2.2% organic material. With good farming methods this could be pushed to 6.5%.

The Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water is broadcast live on Mondays, 10 a.m., PST/PDT. The syndicated radio talk show is heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Network and Apple iTunes. For more information about Sharon Kleyne, Bio Logic Aqua Research and Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® go to http://www.naturestears.com. For a written summary or on-demand podcast of this interview, go to http://www.sharonkleynehour.com/Archive2012/Organic_Dryland_Farming_Water_Solution_Drought_States_Fred_Kirschenmann.php

© 2013 Bio-Logic Aqua Research (172Q). Sharonkleynehour.wordpress.com. All rights reserved.

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Sharon Kleyne Hour on Educating Children and Schools about Food

Interview with Tracy Hardy of the Rogue Valley Farm to Schools Program

Childhood obesity is a national health crisis and awareness of food choices other than fast foods and sugar drinks, are crucial to fighting the problem. That was the conclusion of Tracy Hardy of the Rogue Valley Farm to School Program, in an interview of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water on April 30, 2012. Her program sponsors summer camps and school field trips to local farms. It is attempting to enlist a participating farm in each Rogue Valley community.

Hardy also expressed concern to Sharon Kleyne about the importance of making sure children know where their food originates when purchased in stores. She and Sharon Kleyne believe in the importance of consuming locally grown food because they are better adapted to the nutritional needs of local residents (and require less fuel to ship).

Rogue Valley Farm to School is a leader in encouraging school districts to purchase more locally grown foods directly from the farms for their school lunches.

Sharon Kleyne reminded listeners that, “What you put in your mouth determines your health. Natural, healthy foods are not expensive and fresh, local, in-season vegetable produce costs less than prepared or imported foods.

As the first step towards good nutrition, Sharon Kleyne urges everyone to drink eight to ten glasses of pure water each day.

The Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water is broadcast live on Mondays, 10 a.m., PST/PDT. The syndicated talk show is heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Network and Apple iTunes. For more information about Sharon Kleyne, Bio Logic Aqua Research and Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® go to http://www.naturestears.com.. For a written summary and on-demand podcast of this interview, go to http://www.sharonkleynehour.com/Archive2012/Innovative_Farm_Education_Programs_Bring_Farming_Nutrition_Life.php#

© 2013 Bio-Logic Aqua Research (142Q). http://www.sharonkleynehour.wordpress.com. All rights reserved.

Aquaponics: Fresh Water Friendly Farming

In a recent interview with Mark Hasey, owner of The Farming Fish, an aquaponic vegetable and fish production operation in Rogue River, Oregon, Sharon Kleyne covered the topic of “aquaponics”. Although the first forms of aquaponics were cultivated by the early Aztecs, now this little known form of agriculture has potential to have a greatly positive impact on not only fresh water supply, but also global food shortages.

The new method works by combining two necessary forms of agriculture; fish farming and plant production. The fish water becomes toxic with excrement and is then moved to the plants, where the excrement becomes nutrients for the plants and the water is filtered by plant absorption. The newly clean water is then moved back to the fish to again be cycled.

Most green leaf vegetables grow well in the hydroponic system, although the most profitable are roses, tomatoes, okra, chinese cabbage, cantaloupe, lettuce, basil, and bell peppers. Other species of vegetables that grow well in an aquaponic system include, taro, radishes, strawberries, melons, beans, parsnips, sweet potato, peas, kohlrabi, watercress, onions, turnips, and herbs.

Aquaponics is beginning to benefit many areas of the world for a variety of reasons. Barbados is a densely populated island with little fresh water that mainly depends on agriculture imports, but with aquaponics they are recycling their water and in return able to gain dependence from the World Food Market. In Bangladesh farmers rely on chemicals to preserve plants during adverse climatic conditions, but recently city dwellers have been using the water recycling system to grow their own safe food. In places like Taiwan, water is government controlled and farmers have begun to rely on aquaponics to increase agriculture while abiding government regulations.

This revolutionizing technology has the potential to help all parts of the world, in many different areas.