World Water Crisis Impacts Climate Change Says Author & Environmental Consultant Fred Pearce

Fred Pearce & Sharon Kleyne Say Water Is #1 Priority of 21st Century. Fresh Water Is Scarce Warn Sharon Kleyne & Fred Pearce.

Fred Pearce has fought for years for cleaner water and a wider understanding of the importance of water in global societies. Author of When the Rivers Run Dry, Earth Then and Now and other books, Pearce’s experiences as an Environmental Consultant and water researcher aligns his work with Sharon Kleyne, host of the nationally syndicated radio program The Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water, Global Climate Change and Your Health on VoiceAmerica sponsored by Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®.

Like Kleyne, Pearce believes that the root of all problems on earth, including climate change, is the planet’s water crisis. Both Kleyne and Pearce point out that in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when earth’s population was smaller, humanity could use water once, let it run off to the sea and wait for nature’s natural cycle to replenish the water humans needed through rainfall. But now the human population on earth has exploded. “We need to take steps to speed up the supplementation and replenishment process,” says Kleyne, “or we will face catastrophic results,”

According to Pearce, solutions to these these catastrophic results will involve recycling waste water and in some cases redirecting the flow of rivers. Describing recycling, Pearce pointed to Singapore, where recycled waste water is being channeled back into reservoirs to be used again instead of being allowed to run to the ocean. Kleyne, also the founder and director of Bio-Logic Aqua® Research Water Life Science® and one of the most respected international new water researchers, agrees that this model must be implemented in cities all around the globe in order to save lives and reduce the outbreak of diseases sparked and spread by unclean water and too little water.

Pearce, also a freelance journalist and expert on the relationship of water shortages in the Middle East and climate change, points to the Middle East where fear and poor farming practices have created an even greater desert than existed there before. Pearce sees the ongoing diversion and drying up of rivers as a major and devastating crisis. “Rivers like the Nile are no longer running to the sea,” he says. This interrupts nature’s natural process of replenishing water, creating water scarcity and hotter temperatures. “Most of us,” Pearce adds, “will experience climate change more through changes of water than changes of temperature. I believe that water will be the number one issue in the 21st century for all of us.”

“Water has got to be our number one priority every day,” says Kleyne. “What governments in the Middle East really want is water,” Kleyne says. So far, poor decisions have thwarted them. Pearce notes how during the war the Iraqi government forced the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers away from the marshes, effectively drying them out. “The more water you remove from the soil,” says Kleyne, “which is a living organism, the drier you make the atmosphere, which contains the water vapor you need to breathe in order to live and be healthy.”

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We hope you found this article useful and helpful regarding water use and health. If you would like to contact us with questions or your own insights and stories about water use and new water technology, you can do so at Sharon@biologicaquaresearch.com 800-367-6478 ~ Fax 541-474-2123 http://www.naturestears.com or on Twitter at @sharonkleynehr We would love to hear from you.

You can also listen to this radio program with guest Fred Pearce at https://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/80866/the-sharon-kleyne-hour-monday-october-6-2014

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Sharon Kleyne Asks Why Can’t We Collect More Rain

The World Has Experienced Climate Change Since the Beginning of Time Says Kleyne. Catching More Rain Would More Than Offset Global Warming Says Kleyne.

Water advocate and Bio-Logic Aqua® Research Water Life Science® founder and director Sharon Kleyne has challenged world leaders and researchers to make water infrastructure their number one priority. Kleyne also insists that they discover and develop new water technology that will allow humanity to capture much more rainfall than it is currently doing. Kleyne believes that by doing so, coupled with the recent discoveries of untapped aquifers in Africa and California would effectively do a lot to lessen the impact of the global warming and dramatic climate change we have witnessed since the dawn of the industrial revolution.

Kleyne reminds people that the world and its watery atmosphere has always experienced climate change. “That’s nothing new,” said Kleyne. “Millions of years ago super volcanoes were polluting the atmosphere just like our automobile and industry carbon emissions do today.” This is a detail that watchdog organizations like NASA and the United Nations inconveniently overlook in their research and assessments that claim human activity accounts for the current global climate crisis. “What’s going on with the weather is natural,” said Kleyne. “It’s happened before and will happen again.”

Meanwhile, Kleyne sticks to her point that much relief could come our way if we redirected our focus onto collecting rain water and preserving and developing new aquifers and reservoirs. “The average person doesn’t take water seriously enough,” said Kleyne, “and world leaders and organizations like the UN have so far been reluctant to devote the necessary resources to education and new technology.” Without these resources, Kleyne believes that we will continue to waste vast quantities of fresh water as it runs off to the oceans.

And what happens as we lose more and more fresh water? According to Kleyne, illnesses increase on a global scale and cures become scarcer and scarcer as we treat symptoms rather than find and develop cures. Kleyne believes that we all must get more serious about health and water education. “We all need to be more proactive,” says Kleyne, “or we’ll be facing global epidemics and fresh water shortages like nothing we’ve ever seen before.”

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Would you like to share your thoughts on the world’s water crisis, water evaporation, water research and new technology? Have you had problems getting and using clean water? What do you think we should do about collecting and using rain water? Do you think that the UN is doing enough to solve humanity’s water problems? If you have comments or stories you’d like to share, we’d like very much to hear from you! You can reach us in the following ways. Sharon@biologicaquaresearch.com 800-367-6478 ~ Fax 541-474-2123 http://www.naturestears.com or on Twitter at @sharonkleynehr

Sharon Kleyne Hour Radio Show Description February 22, 2016

The Sharon Kleyne Hour radio show for February 22, 2016 was a replay from April 20, 2015.

Two noted scientists discuss climate change and water chemistry
L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD (Ashville, NC), Chief Climatologist Global Science & Technology, Inc and Gerald H. Pollack, PhD (Seattle, WA), Professor of Bioengineering, University of Washington.

NASA/NOAA Climatologist Says Global Water Resources Disaster Can Be Averted

Retired NOAA/NASA Climatologist L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD, Discusses Global Water Politics on Sharon Kleyne Hour Radio Show

If management of Earth’s water resources continues on its present path, the results could be disastrous reports retired NOAA and NASA Climatologist L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD, The terrible effects of diminishing water resources and global drought, according to Dr, Cecil, are already seen in Yemen and Somalia. California, Nevada and Arizona may not be far behind, creating a grim world of chronic, widespread water scarcity. Fortunately, Dr. Cecil also believes that there may be reasons for optimism.

Dr. Cecil made his remarks on the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show, where he is a frequent guest. Dr. Cecil is currently employed by Global Science and Technology of Ashville, North Carolina

Sharon Kleyne, host of the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water show, is Founder of Bio-Logic Aqua Research, a fresh water, atmospheric and health research and product development center. Natures Tears EyeMist is the Research Center’s global signature product for dry eyes. The show is broadcast on the VoiceAmerica Variety Channel, Health and Wellness Channel, and Apple iTunes.

The main causes of water shortages, Dr. Cecil believes, tend to be more political and economic than environmental. Political causes can include greedy or impoverished governments unwilling or unable to spend money on water infrastructure; unscrupulous leaders who use water as a weapon of control; and water shortages as justification to attack other countries. Poor water infrastructure is the most frequent economic cause. In the United States, water shortages may result from governments not willing to work together and from shortsightedness in planning for the future of water resources.

Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne both emphasize that without water, life on Earth could not survive. Dr. Cecil noted that the resolution of human conflict regarding water is made more difficult because chronic physical dehydration from drinking too little water can cause an increase in stress, aggression and anger. Abundant water and good nutrition has the opposite effect.

Dr. Cecil cited that Salt Lake Valley in Utah as an area struggling with water resource allocation. Projections are that by 2035, the snow pack in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains will decrease by one-third while the valley population will double. Meanwhile, according to Cecil, annual drought in the United States, which used to be confined to the arid West (California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Texas), now includes Colorado, Georgia and Alabama.

Under the George W. Bush administration, Dr. Cecil noted, an attempt was made to discover ways to counteract the global water crisis through engineering – building more dams and pipelines. Barak Obama places a greater emphasis on conservation. Under his approach, if using a beneficial resource, such as a river, is discovered to be harmful to the environment, rather than seek ways to mitigate the harm, they would simply make it illegal to use the resource.

Such an approach is of little benefit to people in Somalia, for example, which lacks basic water, food, shelter, clothing, medical care and sanitation.

The places to start in solving the global water resources problem, according to Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne, are: (1) Population control. (2) The use of technology to increase the amount of available fresh water on the globe. (3) Making fresh water a basic human right available to everyone at no cost.

The reason for Dr Cecil’s is that a few places in the world with chronic water shortages have solved their problem. The densely populated island nation of Singapore is the best example. Despite recent extend drought, Singapore has not cut back on its water allotments.

Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne believe that if properly and innovatively managed, with people working together, there should be enough water for everyone. Despite the current drought in many parts of the globe, according to Cecil and Kleyne, humans on Earth n Earth have the ability and knowledge right now to avoid a global water disaster.

The question is, will the people in charge act in time or will they bicker and drag their heels until it’s too late?

original article

New Education about Menopause, Dry Eye and the Global Dry Eye Crisis

Sharon Kleyne, host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water syndicated radio talk show, recently interviewed Laurie Barber, MD, Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Arkansas and a leading authority on dry eye syndrome. The interview may be heard on-demand on World Talk Radio, Voice America, Green Talk Network and Apple iTunes.

An important Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water objective is to raise awareness of the growing worldwide crisis in dry eye disease, and proactive steps that may be taken to prevent or alleviate dry eye symptoms. Untreated dry eye disease, according to Sharon Kleyne, can lead to corneal ulceration, visual impairment and blindness.

Sharon Kleyne is especially interested in the link between dry eye disease, air quality, polluted humidity, dry air, climate change, dehydrating indoor and outdoor environments and the amount of water we drink daily.

Noting that dry eye symptoms are the number one complaint that ophthalmologists hear from patients, Sharon Kleyne asked how Dr. Barber became interested in dry eye. Dr. Barber indicated that she practices in all areas of ophthalmology but does research on corneal inflammation, which can be caused by dry eye. There is no skin over the cornea and it is protected only by the corneal membrane and the tear film so it’s very delicate. If the tear film is healthy, the eye is likely to be healthy. And there are many important substances in the tear film aside from salt water – hormones, antibodies, mucins, lipids and so forth.

Sharon Kleyne noted that numeorus environmental drying factors that work against the tear film and can cause dry eye, dry skin and dry mouth. Also, dry eye ius often usymptomatic. Sharon asked abou the main symptoms of dry eye?

In younger people, according to Dr. Barber, there are very few symptoms. As we get older, after age 35 or so, we may lose the ability to keep the tear film in top-notch condition without helping it along, more among women than men. Dry eye after age 35, Dr. Barber explained, is believed to be caused by a drop-off in androgen, a male sex hormone, that occurs in both men and women. Dry eye symptoms include burning, itching, irritated, red eyes, and blurred vision. Also, what we call “eye fatigue.”

Sharon Kleyne cited a prior guest, Marguerite McDonald, MD, who observed that if you ever want LASIK surgery later in life, you should take excellent care of your eyes and contact lenses when you are young.

Sharon Kleyne then asked spedcifically about dry eye and menopausal women. I’m sure dry eye also shows up in men of the same age. Dr. Barber replied that older men are also prone to dry eye symptoms, esepciaaly men on prostate medication. The hormonal changes leading to menopause, she explained, start at around age 35 and men have some of the same hormone fluctuations as women. But women have a lot more hormones and a lot more dry eye.

S: Do you have any advice about artificial tears?

L: You need to limit it to four or five application a day, especially when using eye drops that contain preservatives, which can be an allergen.

S: You sound very concerned about vision care education. People are often unaware of the harm they can do to their eyes. Can you become addicted to eye drops?

L: That’s often talked about but I don’t think there have been any actual studies to determine whether using eye drops sets up a self-perpetuating need, as is the case with nose drops. Most people only use eye drops for a short duration.

S: Is there a test for dry eye?

L: The Shirmer test can be done by ophthalmologists or optometrists. They put a strip of blotting paper inside the eyelid for a specified amount of time and see how much liquid it soaks up.

S: What role does the skin around the eyes play in dry eye? Usually, when the eye is dry, the eyelids are inflamed and the eyelid skin is dry and flaky.

L: The lid margins are particularly problematic because that’s where the oil producing meibomium gland are located. The lids are also a “hot spot” for skin cancer. But any time you have serious symptoms, it’s time to see the doctor. They can recommend a pure water mist supplement like Nature’s Tears EyeMist, artificial tears, various medications, punctual plugs, etc.

S: And of course it’s important to keep eyes moist by drinking plenty of water – and I don’t mean coffee or soda.

L: Hydration and diet are critical. You should also eat green, leafy veggies, fruit and omega-3’s.

S: What about occupational health and eye care? Employers need to be taught about vision and forced air heating and cooling, computers, etc.

L: We all take our vision for granted until something bad happens. It’s human nature.

S: Could you talk about sleep and rest?

L: It’s very important to eye health, of course. It’s important to truly rest your eyes at night, and allow them to recover, which means not wearing contact lenses to bed. The tear film restores itself while you sleep – the glands recharge, the pH drops, etc.

S: Do you get a lot of patients with eye-stressing occupations or lifestyles, such as truck drivers or motorcycle riders?

L: Yes, those occupations all involve intense concentration or staring and the person often forgets to blink, which causes too much moisture to evaporate from the tear film. The best way to deal with that is prevention such as goggles or helmets, or pre-treatment such as applying eye drops or eye mist before you go motorcycling.

S: What about computers?

L: Computers also involve staring and cause you to blink less. You need to take frequent breaks to rest your eyes, make sure there isn’t a vent blowing on you, and position yourself to look slightly down on the screen.

S: And finally, tell us what to do about menopausal dry eye?

L: The same as you would for hot flashes. Exercise, drink lots of water, try to stay in a cool place and wear layered clothing so you can cool yourself off.

S: Exercise reduces stress and stimulates your system but can also be dehydrating.

L: Yes. So maybe as you get into menopause, you want to do only moderate exercise. If you’re training for a marathon – and I’ve worked with Olympic athletes – you need to be very meticulous about hydration. If you’re a swimmer, you need to watch your chlorine exposure.

S: Thank you so much, Dr. Barber. My next guest is Rebekah Jones of Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Nevada, who is going to tell us more about Lake Mead and especially about an invasive mussel shell that’s been causing no end of problems there.

Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water is sponsored by Bio-Logic Aqua Research, whose Nature’s Tears EyeMist, a breakthrough hand-held personal all-natural water humidifying device for dry eye. Nature’s Tears EyeMist is available at http://www.BioLogicAqua.com, Amazon.com, drugstore.com and selected drugstores nationwide.

Listen to the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water Mondays, 10 a.m., PST/PDT. The syndicated radio talk show is heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Network and Apple iTunes. Go to http://www.SharonKleyneHour.com for written summaries and on-demand replays. Also visit http://www.naturestears.com, whatistheeye.wordpress.com, “Nature’s Tears EyeMist” on Facebook and “Bio-Logic Aqua” on Twitter.

Website: http://www.womenseyehealth.org.

2012 Bio-Logic Aqua Research

Weather Extremes Increasing With Climate Change

Aiguo Dai, PhD (Boulder, CO), National Center for Atmospheric Research. “Is climate change about to catch up to us?”

Dr. Dai, an Atmospheric Scientist, became interested in climate change when he moved to the US from China in 1990. He believes that climate is a global issue affecting nearly everyone.

Sharon Kleyne observed that climate is always changing and asked about the role of water in climate change. According to Dr. Dai, Earth’s climate had been relatively stable for the last 10,000 years (Earth is four billion years old) but weather has been more active over the last 200 years, with rapid warming and changing atmospheric streams. Some wildlife species have been unable to adapt. It is unclear how much, if any, is human caused.

Mrs. Kleyne notes that we must live with Earth no matter what and that in general, humans are not good at this.

Dr. Dai notes that river flow volume is decreasing in many regions worldwide, creating water stress among most living organisms. With population growth, demand for fresh water is simultaneously increasing, particularly for drinking and agriculture.

Mrs. Kleyne believes that the solution is to educate the public about the needs for conservation and for human activities that are less environmentally damaging. Dr. Dai adds that the consequences of doing nothing are extremely dire and that the situation will not improve on its own. We must change our consumption habits, and we must store and conserve water.

Sharon Kleyne then asked Dr. Dai about the Yellow River in China. It is extremely polluted, often toxic and prone to immense flooding (for the last thousand miles, it flows between natural levees, at an elevation higher than the surrounding plain). It also feeds an extremely fertile region. Water flow in the Yellow River has been diminishing for 200 years. These problems are both human caused and natural.

Sharon wondered how China influences the rest of the world and if we in the US can help in any way. Dr. Dai noted that change in China is very slow and that they are beginning to ship water from the Yangtze, in the south, and to dig deeper water wells. He is an advocate of wind farms for power. There is much drift of China’s polluted air to countries such as South Korea and Japan who have much stricter air quality standards.

Sharon noted that draught can contribute to air temperature, and to air and water pollution. Drought effect the amount of humidity in the air and the surface temperature of lakes and oceans, which affect the rate of evaporation. Theoretically, the cycle is self-correcting, since more evaporation means more rain.

Some polluted water may be OK for irrigation but not for drinking.

Conclusion: The United States has been fortunate in its weather for the past 50 years. That may change in the next 10 to 20 years as energy extremes. created by the increased weather activity, express themselves.

Water, Global Warming and International Boundaries

(Note: World Water Week, sponsored by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), is an annual global conference that takes place in Stockholm each August. It’s focus on the global water crisis, healthy water and sanitation, water and natural health, water diseases, worldwide drought, climate change and natural health is compatible with the mission of the Sharon Kleyne Hour. Flavia Loures is a specialist in International water law and policy for the World Wildlife Fund, which is vitally interested on the impact of the global water crisis on human and animal health and demographics.)

Ms. Loures lives in Washington DC and was interviewed from Stockholm, Sweden, where she was participating in World Water Week – 2010. Her topic was “Transboundary Water,” or water that crosses international borders (she was born in Brazil). Flavia has been attending World Water Week since 2006 and believes that it is creating global awareness and momentum.

There is an extensive body of international law regarding shared water between nations and the world could come together, if the countries involved were willing, to settle most regional water wars. In Stockholm, they tend to take an “internationalist” point of view whereas on the ground, people tend to be more fiercely nationalistic. Continue reading “Water, Global Warming and International Boundaries”